Economic Inequality and the Church with Trinity Institute

We’re excited to continue our partnership with Trinity Institute by offering another course on Economic Inequality and the Church. Inequality — of resources, jobs, opportunities — robs people of their human dignity, one of the precious gifts from God we as Christians promise to honor and uphold. But the issue can seem so overwhelming, so complex and entrenched, that we don’t know where to start.

Why not start with each other? Conversation, discussion, sharing of ideas and resources, is one of CCG Logothe great gifts of living in community. The video lectures in this latest course are full of wisdom and ideas while being provocative, challenging calls to action. We invite you to use this latest course in a way that is most helpful to your church or small group. Choose any or all of the video lectures and accompanying discussion questions to get yourselves thinking and talking about ways we can carry out Jesus’ mission of love, service, selfless generosity, and neighborliness.

Malcolm Brown, director of the Mission and Public Affairs Division for the Church of England, argues that, contrary to public opinion over the last century, economics is the Church’s business; he tells how the Church of England is setting up credit unions in local parishes to support and encourage responsible economic stewardship. Juliet Schor, Professor of Sociology at Boston College, discusses how increasing concern around economic inequality, as well as environmental sustainability, have spurred new trends and hopeful responses, a real movement toward mindful, intentional, responsible living.  And Michael Bowling, pastor of Englewood Christian Church in Indianapolis, reminds us that the message of the Gospel is not complex:  we are called to deny ourselves, to love others more than we love ourselves, to take up our cross and follow Jesus’ example of ministry. He shares how his inner-city congregation has made educational equality a priority in order to support those who are most vulnerable – children – as well as the parents who are trying to provide for them.

There is perhaps no more challenging but vital mission than loving and caring for our neighbors — let’s start by working for equality and plenitude for all. Click here for more information or to take the course.

The Big Class: Called to Common Good with Cornel West is now live!

“Never forget that justice is what love looks like in public.”

~ Dr. Cornel West

Then the King will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father; take your inheritance, the kingdom prepared for you since the creation of the world. For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in. I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.’ Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you something to drink? When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? When did we see you sick or in prison and go to visit you?’ The King will reply, ‘Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.’ (Matthew 25:35-40)

Join us, today through January 21st, as we attend to one of the most pressing issues of our time: economic inequality — and what we as Christians can and should do about it. We are each of us made in the image of God, which means we are entitled to equal dignity, opportunity, and justice. And yet the United States — one of the most nominally religious societies in the world, with 82% of Americans calling themselves Christians — is also founded on fiercely competitive capitalistic westvalues, leaving entire classes of citizens struggling with poverty, lack of education and opportunity, and a deep sense of powerlessness and despair.  How does the Gospel speak to this disconnect? What are we called to do in response to such an overwhelming problem?

Our lecturer, Dr. Cornel West, has often spoken out for justice and equality, specifically what American Christians are called to do; in this course, derived from the Trinity Institute’s 2015 “Creating Common Good” conference, he shares his own insights and experiences wrestling with the problem of inequality, how this issue relates to Christian teaching, and why it’s so vital to the health of our very souls. This course promises to be a thought-provoking and productive contribution to creating common good.

Thanks to the generosity of the following sponsors, The Big Class is offered free of charge to all:

Trinity Institute is an annual conference, now in its 44th year, that equips clergy and laypersons for imaginative and catalytic leadership. The conference is sponsored by Trinity Wall Street, an Episcopal parish in New York City. Trinity Institute takes place at Trinity Church in New York City and is streamed at Partner Sites (which are often churches and seminaries) throughout the world. For more information, click here.

Forward Movement, a ministry of the Episcopal Church, grew out of the determination of the General Convention in 1934 to counter a period of anxiety, distrust, and decline in the Episcopal Church with a “forward movement” charged to “reinvigorate the life of the church and to rehabilitate its general, diocesan, and parochial work.” Best known for the popular daily devotional Forward Day by Day, which provides daily meditations based on Bible scripture readings appointed by the lectionary and Daily Office. Forward Day by Day is published in English, Spanish, large print, audio cassette, and Braille editions, and the daily meditation is available online.

The Episcopal Church

ChurchNext creates online Christian learning experiences that shape disciples. Along with our partners we are devoted to helping people grow in their Christian faith, improve their lives, and better the world. 

The Big Class with Cornel West: “Called to Common Good: Economic Inequality and What Christians Can Do About It”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Cornel West to Teach Free, Online Course

“CALLED TO COMMON GOOD:

ECONOMIC INEQUALITY AND WHAT CHRISTIANS CAN DO ABOUT IT”


Open to anyone in the world between January 11-21

December 29, 2014, BLOOMFIELD  HILLS, MI – Cornel West, prominent intellectual, author, and cultural critic, will teach an online course on economic inequality that is open to all, from January 11-21.  This is an opportunity to learn about one of the most pervasive problems in the U.S. from one of the most thought-provoking teachers of our time.west

 

The online course derives from the Trinity Institute’s 2015 “Creating Common Good” conference on economic inequality and is offered through ChurchNext, a leader in online Christian education. The class, a series of video lectures and discussions, can be taken anytime between January 11-21. No special software is required. It will take an average learner about 45 minutes to complete. Registration is free and open worldwide beginning today. (Click here for more information or to register.)

 

Dr. Cornel West has often spoken out for justice and equality, specifically what American Christians are called to do about it; the Trinity Institute, a program of Trinity Wall Street, is an annual conference, now in its 44th year, aimed at gathering clerics and intellectuals to discuss matters of deep significance. The upcoming 2015 conference focuses on the often-overwhelming issue of economic inequality. (Click here for more information on the Trinity Institute.)

 

Throughout Called to Common Good, participants are encouraged to think about and discuss economic injustice and moral responsibility. Dr. West explores the problem of inequality, notions of public and private justice, and how communities can effect change. He contends that “no matter how extreme inequalities are, we’ve always got a common humanity,” which is why, he adds, “I cannot be an optimist but I am a prisoner of hope.” During the class, representatives from Trinity Institute will be on hand to respond to discussions.

 

Online learning hub ChurchNext has partnered with Trinity Institute to present Dr. West’s course as well as four other previously-released courses taught by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, educational advocate Nicole Baker Fulgham, evangelical blogger Rachel Held Evans, and Julio Murray, Episcopal bishop of Panama.

 

Called to Common Good is a worldwide online learning course for all who are interested in social justice and the Christian faith and is free, thanks to the support of Trinity Institute, The Episcopal Church, and Forward Movement.

 

Trinity Institute is an annual conference, now in its 44th year, that equips clergy and laypersons for imaginative and catalytic leadership. The conference is sponsored by Trinity Wall Street, an Episcopal parish in New York City. Trinity Institute takes place at Trinity Church in New York City and is streamed at Partner Sites (which are often churches and seminaries) throughout the world. For more information, visit https://www.trinitywallstreet.org/trinity-institute/2015/what’s-ti2015

 

ChurchNext creates online Christian learning experiences that shape disciples. Along with our partners we are devoted to helping people grow in their Christian faith, improve their lives, and better the world. Learn more at http://churchnext.tv

 

“Creating Common Good 4: A Christian Response with Archbishop Justin Welby” launches today

In this, the fourth ChurchNext course previewing Trinity Institute’s Creating Common Good conference, Archbishop of Canterbury the Most Rev. Justin Welby offers a Christian Response to the often overwhelming and disheartening problems of poverty and economic injustice. Rather than focusing on what we can’t do, the Archbishop urges us to focus on what we as a Church can offer: on-the-ground help, a message of hope, a challenge to cynicism, an understanding of human nature, and a commitment to outward, other-oriented service. welby

In this course, we consider ways that radical, systemic change has been accomplished with the support of churches; we reflect on the theology of “common good” and economic equality; and we explore concrete ways the Church can help right now. Creating Common Good 4: A Christian Response is a thought-provoking, inspiring, and hopeful look at how we as Christians can, when we follow God’s call, accomplish amazing things with the abundant gifts we’ve been given. Click here to register or for more information.

 The Most Rev. Justin Welby is the 105th and current Archbishop of Canterbury. Learn more about his mission and ministry here.

Creating Common Good 1 with Bishop Julio Murray now available

We’re pleased to launch the first Creating Common Good course in partnership with Trinity Institute. In Creating Common Good 1: Economic Inequality and Injustice, Bishop Julio Murray addresses the inequalities present in economic systems and how these are signs not only of distorted relationships between human beings, but also between God and God’s creation.

jmurrayWhat is the Church’s role in righting this relationship? How can the Church give voice to those who have found creativity in scarcity? How might the Church model a new way of living — living in contentment with enough?  This course challenges, informs, and inspires us as we seek to address the overwhelming problem of economic injustice in our world.  Click here to register or for more information.

The Rt. Rev. Julio Murray is a popular speaker and preacher. He serves as the Anglican bishop of Panama. He is a featured speaker at Trinity Institute 2015; click here to learn more.